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Slide Notes

According to the Common Core Mission Statement, "...standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers." (http://www.corestandards.org/)

In the workplace students will need to be able to collaborate, communicate, create, and think critically. Digital storytelling is the perfect vehicle to develop these skills in our students today.

The Core of Movie Making:

Published on Nov 18, 2015

Meeting the Common Core State Standards through student film making...

PRESENTATION OUTLINE

The Core of Movie Making:

Student Film as a performance task
According to the Common Core Mission Statement, "...standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers." (http://www.corestandards.org/)

In the workplace students will need to be able to collaborate, communicate, create, and think critically. Digital storytelling is the perfect vehicle to develop these skills in our students today.
Photo by Joybot

digital storytelling

is Common core in action.
Performance tasks are intended to measure student mastery of both content area standards and work expose the Common Core habits of mind. Student demonstration of mastery is inherent not only in the finished student product, but also in the process of writing, planning, executing, and refining digital stories. Digital storytelling is the Common Core in action.
Photo by mikebaird

Building the 4 C's

The 4 C's are collaboration, communication, critical thinking, and creativity. Productive members of the workplace must be able to clearly articulate themselves in both speaking and writing; actively listen to others as part of a collaborative environment; persistently problem solve through careful analysis; and create original content. Filmmaking gives students the opportunity to grow their skills in each of these key areas.
Photo by Leo Reynolds

Collaboration:

conceptualize, plan, and execute
The process of creating student movies requires a great deal of cooperative learning. Being able to define a vision, manage time and resources, work together to overcome challenges, and successfully execute a group plan requires a strong collaborative ability.
Photo by SFB579 :)

communication:

speaking and listening to plan and deliver 
Often, instructional activities for a teacher's typical lesson plan include structured opportunities to speak and listen. For example, students may be asked to think-pair-share the answer to a lesson prompt. However, during the process of digital storytelling, students engage in almost constant communication that is far more authentic in nature than a structured conversation at a desk. When given the opportunity to make movies, some of the quietest students in my classes become the most vocal. The loudest students are often forced to listen by necessity, and every child is engaged.

critical thinking:

problem solving, innovation
Few digital learning tasks require as much critical thinking as digital storytelling. As Ben Franklin asserted, "Necessity is the Mother of Invention." Throughout every stage of production, particularly during the actual filming and during the editing stage, innovation is key. Finding new uses for old resources, resolving lighting issues, actively revising scripts to better communicate themes, and adapting on location - all of these are examples of the type of on-the-spot problem solving that is inherent in student film.
Photo by adwriter

Creativity:

authoring and producing content 
My students are middle school kids, grades 6th through 8th, and I have to say that after nine years of working with this age group - they are very poignant people with a distinct point of view and plenty to say. Giving students the chance to author their own digital content increases the ownership kids feel over their work. When students are invested, they are successful. And success - even a little of it - tends to increase exponentially.

CCSS Writing 6: "Use Technology, including the

Internet, to produce and publish writing..."
Common Core Writing strand 6 (K-12 literacy standards): "Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing..."

digital literacy

the development of visual and
Visual and digital literacy have been neglected in the past. Undoubtedly, the visual and digital literacy inherent in student video production means that students will refine their understanding of how to tell an effective digital story each time they engage in the process. This type of learning often includes depth of knowledge level 3 or 4 activities.

development of a Lexicon:

transferable, academic vocabulary of film
Students who tell digital stories develop a transferable lexicon that can apply to more than one subject. For example, students must be able to understand and articulate how both writing and film utilize "transitions" as part of effective communication. Placing emphasis on the vocabulary of filmmaking gives students a common language to use as engage in the process of digital storytelling.
Photo by Leo Reynolds

Redefinition of learning:

from consumer to producer
Ultimately, we seek to redefine learning in our classrooms. According to the SAMR scale of technology implementation, a task "redefines learning" when it would be inconceivable to complete without the use of technology. Helping our students shift from consumers to producers of media means that we are literally giving them the opportunity to redefine how they learn.

What's the endgame?

How far beyond consumption can students go?
Student filmmaking requires both flexibility and thoughtfulness on the part of the teacher. Video production with students is an activity that builds momentum over time; each year, I find myself wondering, "How far beyond consumption can this group of students go?" As a result, I strive to give them limitless possibilities by utilizing my favorite word: YES.

-Can we build a miniature set and film our scene like that? (Yes.)

-Can we stay after school to film when the campus is quieter? (Yes.)

-Can we shoot on location at the Salton Sea on a Saturday? (Yes.)

-Can I use influences of slam poetry in my finished film? (Yes.)

Authentic audience

inspires new heights of quality, motivation
To share original media content with the world at large, taking their message to a broad audience, is an incredible experience for students of all ages. The most magical aspect of media production for an authentic audience is the consistency with which student products surge to new heights of quality. Knowing that the teacher is NOT the audience for student work provides strong motivation. For a student, being able to share digital stories via YouTube or Vimeo channels is like shouting their thoughts to the world.

Digital Storytelling:

OUt of the box student voice.
Perhaps most importantly, video production provides students with the opportunity to stretch their own voice out into the world. Common Core sanctions the notion that students must learn to live, think, and work "out of the box." To that end, the core of movie-making is really giving students the chance to do so authentically.

By @Packwoman208

Jessica pack, 2014 California Teacher of the YEar
Jessica Pack teaches 6th grade Language Arts, #flipclass Social Studies, and Video Production/Leadership for Palm Springs Unified. She is a 2014 California Teacher of the Year and blogs at www.packwomantech.com

Follow Jessica on Twitter @Packwoman208
Photo by fung.leo