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Slide Notes

PWCARES: Go Kits 2017

Published at Jan 01, 1970

We hear about it all the time - grab your go-kit. But just what is a go-kit, and why is it important. What should go in it, and more importantly, what should not go in it. We will review and refresh.

PRESENTATION OUTLINE

GO KITS

    Photo by zone41

    WHAT ARE WE PREPARING FOR?

      We are preparing for an all-hazards emergency, whether that is natural or man-made.
      Photo by Mark Sardella

      BUT NOT THIS

        Zombies. Really? I suppose, but the principles​ are the same.

        BEFORE

        • Create a personal & family plan
        • Evacuation Decision Tree
        • Personal Go-Kit(s)
        • Family Go-Kits(s)
        • Radio Go-Kit
        • Secure personal papers
        • Prepare an I.C.E card
        For information about personal preparedness, visit:
        http://www.pwcares.org/html/prepare.html

        I.C.E: In case of emergency. Recommended but not required. This is a card or electronic entry in your mobile device (make it a card in your wallet, include your meds)

        WHAT IS A GO KIT?

        • The bag or box with all that stuff in it
        • A collection of things you might need when called to activate
        Go kit, bug out bag, it is all the same thing.

        You might want to consider a larger go-kit that resides in your vehicle that can be used to stock your personal kits or carried in case you are caught without your personal kit.
        Photo by VMBrasseur

        WHAT TO INCLUDE

        • Comfort items
        • Sort of important stuff
        • Seasonal adjustments
        • Really important stuff
        • Kind of important stuff
        We are talking about radio go-kits here. Your definition of what is important is may be different.
        Photo by Zemlinki!

        REALLY IMPORTANT STUFF

        • Power supply
        • Your radio
        • Quick Reference Guide
        • Headset/External mic
        • Identification
        • Medical and Snacks
        • Antenna and coax and connectors
        ID includes your driver's license, any other government issued id, FCC operating license.

        Radio can be an HT, mobile, or base, or any combination

        Most deployments will be in noisy situations. Headphones are usual a must.

        Food and water means enough water for your needs for the length of the operation. Hydration systems are great. You might want to keep an empty water bottle in your car and fill it from the litre or larger water bottles as needed. Keep non-salty snacks in your bag (gorp, fruit snacks, Power Bars etc).
        Photo by moyix

        REALLY IMPORTANT (CONT)

        • Work gloves
        • Stationary
        • Sunscreen
        • "Sucky things"
        • Appropriate clothing
        Sucky things: Life Savors, throat lozenges. You would be amazed how dry your throat will get

        Work gloves, with some other glove, like latex gloves, form a good barrier and keep your hands warm.

        Stationary: Something to write on and write with. At least a Sharpie and a china pencil.
        Photo by ecfman

        KIND OF IMPORTANT STUFF

        • Money
        • Additional connectors
        • Sleeping bag
        • Flashlight or other light source
        • Extra power source(s)
        • Tool kit(s)
        • First Aid kit
        Money: Both coin and paper. Do not expect your cards to work.

        First Aid kits: We are not first responders, but you would be amazed how many times I have cut myself.

        Sleeping bag is good to have if you get stuck at the site.

        Flashlights: There are so many to choose from. Get one that has the most flexibility in terms of power. Lithium powered lights provide lots of light, but 123 batteries are not easy to come by in large quantities while AA and D are. You may or may not want to have a “headlight” as well. Again, batteries are a consideration.

        Multi-tool: A Leatherman, Gerber, Swiss Army knife all work. You want something that cuts cable, strips wire and spreads peanut butter. Some areas will NOT let you take knives into them. Be prepared to drop your tools at security check points.
        Photo by mr.smashy

        SORT OF IMPORTANT STUFF

        • Misc cables
        • Change of clothes
        • Chair/Table/Cot
        • Shelter
        • Extension cords
        • Soldering iron
        Extension cords include both power and coax. And associated connectors.

        Shelter could be an easy up, a tent or something else to protect you if you are outdoors.
        Photo by steve-uk

        COMFORT ITEMS

        • Pillow
        • Downtime Entertainment
        • Toiletries
        • Sweats/Sweater
        • Change of underwear
        Never underestimate the value of a good pillow.

        It can get cold, even in the summer. Having a sweatshirt to pull on makes things bearable.

        Nothing feels better than clean underwear.
        Photo by just.Luc

        HOW TO TAKE CARE OF IT

          WHAT TO PUT IT IN

          • Plastic boxes
          • Backpacks
          • Vests
          • Jeep or similar large haul vehicle
          • Bags
          There are a number of bags available for gear. Popular manufacturers include Maxpedition and 5.11. You can look at Quartermaster (http://www.qmuniforms.com), 5.11 (http://www.511tactical.com/), Maxpedition (https://www.maxpedition.com) or Galls (http://www.galls.com) for a variety of bags. Vests can be found at ScotteVest (http://www.scottevest.com), as well as other listed above. Jeep is a registered trademark of FCA, LLC

          SMALL ITEM ORGANIZATION

          • Compression sacks save space
          • Bring spare zip lock bags
          • Garbage bags for waterproofing
          • Roll clothes and put them in stuff sack
          • No GLASS!
          Any outdoor/camping store will have stuff sacks, compression sacks, and other waterproof options.

          CARE AND FEEDING

          • Don't buy it all at once
          • People change over time
          • Take care of your gear
          • Food, water and meds have shelf lifes
          • Rubber ages
          Check your gear yearly. Rubber ages out (especially in socks and underwear) and clothes tend to shrink in storage.

          Ensure your maintenance meds are rotated. Check with your doctor about acquiring a larger allotment for preparedness.

          SEASONAL ADJUSTMENTS

          • Hat and sunscreen
          • Layers for Winter
          • DC can have 40 degree temperature swings
          Winter tends to need layers of clothes.

          A hat in invaluable, regardless of the season.

          You can get a sunburn in winter.

          Keep lip balm around, even in the summer.
          Photo by Random Retail

          LAST MINUTE ITEMS

          • Rain Coat
          • Water
          • Things to grab on the way out
          • Hat
          • Any charging batteries
          • Emergency Meds
          Photo by Greg Marshall

          SHOW AND TELL

            Photo by psd

            David Lane

            Haiku Deck Pro User