1 of 9

Slide Notes

The Presentation - The majority of the information for presentation is not seen by the viewer. What the audience sees is only a small percentage. Your presentation should inspire them to look further, and alert them to the possibility of important material ahead.
DownloadGo Live

Presentation

Published on Nov 23, 2015

Presentation

PRESENTATION OUTLINE

The Presentation

History 8 
The Presentation - The majority of the information for presentation is not seen by the viewer. What the audience sees is only a small percentage. Your presentation should inspire them to look further, and alert them to the possibility of important material ahead.
Photo by jeffmikels

Have a Point

Your presentation should include a clear focus for your audience. The presentation is not a place where you can expect your audience to acquire and maintain minute details. The presentation is a place for the BIG picture. Determine what the BIG picture is and maintain focus on it during the presentation. Copy and Paste this link,

http://on.ted.com/Kim

You will see a presentation with a singular focus on a topic that cannot be missed by the audience.

Notebook: What do you believe the point of your presentation will be.

Plan a Route

You and Your Audience Should Know
This should be done right from the start. Never start your presentation until you know what you want to say and how you plan on saying it. Don't get lost in the wilderness of your understanding.

Visualize

Let the Audience 'See' The point
Allow your audience to see you point, the images that you can bring to the table with stay with your audience longer. If you must have data for them to use, print it out and give it to them.

Here is a great link to explain the role of the visual in helping out a presentation. Copy and Paste into your address bar.

http://presentationzen.blogs.com/presentationzen/2005/09/whats_good_powe.ht...

Notebook: Identify three concepts you are going to want to represent visually. What images might work?

Photo by Daniel Y. Go

NO, No, No!

Bullet Points are for wimps
In Cliff Atkinson's book, Beyond Bullet Points, Atkinson says that "...bullet points create obstacles between presenters and audiences." He correctly claims that bullets tend to make our presentations formal and stiff, serve to "dumb down" our points, and lead to audiences being confused...and bored.
Photo by nosha

empty

Don't be afraid to be great.

When the image gets out of the way, the audience will be forced to focus on you. If you have an especially important point to make, that's what you want. It can make a presenter uncomfortable not to have an image as a crutch, but at certain points it can be critical to the audience understanding the point. This is your opportunity to stand out and to make your presentation great. That's what your goal should be, greatness.

Notebook: What is the most important idea that you want to have your audience hear from your voice?
Photo by Abby Lanes

.....Like a Baby's Bottom

SMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOTH 
The key to a smooth presentation is to practice. This little baby is practicing and when he makes it to his recital will play the piece intended smoothly and with confidence. You should do the same with your presentation. Practice.

Notebook: Write down two ways that you will practice your presentation before Tuesday January 16t

Have Fun

This is your learning. You have worked really hard and you have something to say. Try and have fun when saying it because having fun is always better than not.

It's another risk to have fun in this situation, but if you want to be great...Have Fun!

Notebook: What is something fun you could do during your presentation?
Photo by Teo's photo