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Slide Notes

Welcome to Haiku Deck!

As you start to use the app, you might notice that we've designed things a little differently.

Just like a haiku, Haiku Deck uses constraints to inspire creative expression. We keep things simple and limit the number of choices you have to make so you can keep the focus on your message, and communicating it clearly.

We've also built the advice of presentation design experts right into the app, making it a snap to create slides that are more visual, more polished, and more effective.

Here is a walk-through of the slide types you can create in Haiku Deck, and how to make the best use of each one.

Haiku Deck Slide Types

An overview of the slide types available in Haiku Deck, and how to use each one effectively.

PRESENTATION OUTLINE

HAIKU DECK SLIDE TYPES

A Field Guide
Welcome to Haiku Deck!

As you start to use the app, you might notice that we've designed things a little differently.

Just like a haiku, Haiku Deck uses constraints to inspire creative expression. We keep things simple and limit the number of choices you have to make so you can keep the focus on your message, and communicating it clearly.

We've also built the advice of presentation design experts right into the app, making it a snap to create slides that are more visual, more polished, and more effective.

Here is a walk-through of the slide types you can create in Haiku Deck, and how to make the best use of each one.

Photo by oschene

LOGO SLIDE TYPE

Additional Contact Info
This slide type makes a perfect opening or closing slide. It's a stylish way to incorporate a company logo and key contact information using the creative, visual style of Haiku Deck.

Here are some great uses for the logo slide type:
* Company name/website
* Presenter name/twitter handle & event hashtag
* Product name/website

Pro tips:
* The optimal size for the circular logo image is 600 x 600 pixels.
* You can use a photograph for the background or a custom solid color background.

Photo by MrUllmi

HEADLINE

Subhead
This slide type is best used to make a crisp, standalone point -- write it like a bold, clear headline with a supporting subhead.

Though many presenters like to combine multiple bullets on one slide so there are fewer slides, you'll communicate more clearly and hold your audience's attention more effectively if you give each point its own slide and just move through them quickly.

Here are some great uses for a Headline/Subhead slide.

PRESENTATION TITLE
Descriptive Subtitle

EVENT TITLE
Location/Date

SHORT STATEMENT
Short supporting detail

"VERY SHORT QUOTE"
Speaker

Another great use for this slide type is to introduce sections or topics within your presentation.
Try using a solid background color or a distinctive pattern so they are easy to identify and follow.

Pro tips:
*Your font size adjusts automatically as you type.
*You can try different slide layouts to place the text so it looks best with your image.
*If the type starts to get very small, you have too much text! Try trimming it down. (You can always include more detail here, in the Notes.)

LIST

  • An item
  • Another item
  • Yet another item
  • One more item
  • And lastly, another item - you can wrap lines if you need to
If you are communicating a set of items in which order is not important, and focusing on them one at a time would feel tedious, you can group them in a short list slide.

Here are the types of things that work well with a list slide:
*An overview of a framework or philosophy
*A list of recommended resources
*An at-a-glance list of quick tips
*Ingredients for a simple project or recipe

Pro tips:
*Your font size adjusts automatically as you type.
*List slides definitely look best with less text -- you can always add more detail here, in the Notes.
*Be sure to use list slides sparingly! Too many bullets = boring.
*Solid-color backgrounds like this help text pop. If you're using a photo background, choose a dark or abstract image, with the text background screen on, for optimal readability.




NUMBERED LIST

  • First item
  • Second item
  • Third item
  • Fourth item
  • Fifth item
  • Sixth item
  • Seventh item
If you're communicating a set of items in which order *is* significant, you can use a numbered list slide.

The numbered list works particularly well for things like this:
*Top responses to a survey
*Five (short) steps in a process
*A ranked list of popular blogs, neighborhoods, restaurants, etc.
*Most-visited pages on your website

Pro tips:
*Your font size adjusts automatically as you type.
*List slides definitely look best with less text -- you can always add more detail here, in the Notes.
*Be sure to use list slides sparingly! Too many bullets = boring.

Multiline slides allow
more space for typing,
because sometimes you have a little more to say.
The layout adjusts
as you type.

Occasionally, you need a little more space to express your idea, and this is a perfect place to use a multiline slide.

Here are some great uses for a multiline slide:
*A quote
*A mission or vision statement
*A positioning statement
*A short poem or story

Pro tips:
*Multiline slides have the most punch when they're mixed in with other slide types.
*There are many layout options to choose from for this slide type -- for example, text covering the whole slide, text covering half the slide, or a floating text box -- experiment to see what works best for your text length and your background image.
*The font size adjusts and wraps automatically, but you can add your own line breaks to help with comprehension and flow.

Use a sidebar slide to split your slide between text and image. You can make the background any color you like.

The new sidebar slide type allows you to split the screen between a block of text and the image of your choice.

Be sure to explore all of the layout options -- you can make your sidebar narrow or wide, and place it on the left, on the right, above, or below your image.

You can make the sidebar any color you like using the solid color tool on the image tab.
Photo by ancawonka

You can also use the green layout button to move the text and background of a sidebar slide to a horizontal orientation, like this.

Want to move your text from the side to the top or bottom? No problem. Just look for the green layout tab to adjust position and size of your text box relative to the background image. It's easy!
Photo by ancawonka

BAR CHART (units)

A bar chart is the best way to compare data using a consistent unit of measurement. You can include 1 to 8 data points, and you can also adjust the scale.

Here are some great uses of a bar chart:
*Monthly Active Users in Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4
*Visits to your blog or website in January, February, March
*Number of people surveyed who prefer chocolate, vanilla, or strawberry ice cream
*Average listing price for a neighborhood in 2014, 2013, 2012, and 2011

Pro tips:
*The color palette changes along with the Theme -- experiment with different Themes for fresh looks.
*Keep labels short.
*It's helpful to call out your units in your chart title.
*You can always add more detail here in the Notes.
* Double click the Y-ax

PIE CHART

A pie chart is the best way to illustrate a parts-to-whole relationship.

You can include 1 to 8 data points, and you can enter figures or data directly -- Haiku Deck will calculate the percentages automatically.

Here are some great uses of a pie chart:
*Breakdown of May web traffic by channel
*Usage of your app by device
Percentage of people surveyed who rated your service excellent, average, or terrible
*The breakdown of a typical day for a role you're hiring for

Pro tips:
*Haiku Deck only displays your data as percentages -- if you'd prefer to show the actual numbers, switch to a bar chart.
*Keep labels short!

STAT CHART

A stat chart is an easy way to create a simple infographic.

You can include up to four data points, and you can include any mixture of figures or text. Stat charts are helpful when you'd like to highlight data points that are measuring different things.

Here are some great uses of a stat chart:
*Unique visitors, average session length, and % of new visitors to your blog
*Sales closed and awards won in the past year
*Number of people in your office, favorite office snack, and average commute time.

Pro tips:
*You have a little more space to work with in the Stat Chart labels.
*Stat Charts look best with fewer data points.

MORE TIPS AND INSPIRATIONS

The Haiku Deck blog is packed with helpful examples and how-to information!

Here are a few popular articles:
10 Winning Presentation Ideas: http://blog.haikudeck.com/10-winning-presentation-ideas/

Getting Started with Haiku Deck:
http://blog.haikudeck.com/haiku-deck-tutorial-getting-started/

Charts and Graphs Made Easy with Haiku Deck:
http://blog.haikudeck.com/charts-and-graphs-made-easy-with-haiku-deck/

You can also visit the Haiku Deck support page to search the knowledge base or ask a question. We're here to help!
https://haikudeck.zendesk.com/home


Photo by duh.denise