Approaches To Knowledge Management2

Published at Nov 19, 2015
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PRESENTATION OUTLINE

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

APPROACHES TO
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INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

Information management gets the right information to the right people at the right time.

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

Knowledge management is the systematic use of organisational knowledge to achieve business outcomes. It's the know-how and the know-what that is typically locked away in our heads.
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SPECIFIC ORGANISATIONAL GOALS

Knowledge management applies collective knowledge to achieve specific organisational goals. If it's not aligned with a particular business outcome, it's just another expense.
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CONSIDER VALUE INSTEAD OF ROI

It's hard to calculate the ROI of knowledge management programmes and practices, so consider value instead. What's the value to your business of quicker on-boarding, better decision-making, no repetition of mistakes, and the greater opportunities for innovation?
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START WITH A PILOT

Run a pilot programme in a single department. Aim to solve a single pain point with an appropriate knowledge management practice. Monitor the outcome.
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AFTER ACTION REVIEWS

There's a range of KM practices that can be employed in an organisation.

After action reviews—what did work? what didn't work? how can we do it next time? The Army is fantastic at this. All blame is dispensed with and everyone's perspective is valuable.
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COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE

Communities of practice — this isn't about just simply working for the same organisation.
These are groups of people interacting over a common interest or passion to share and develop that knowledge further. They are voluntary and not connected with deliverables.
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KNOWLEDGE AUDIT

A knowledge audit is a qualitative evaluation of organisational knowledge.
What are the knowledge needs of the business, and what are the gaps? What assets exist and what is the knowledge flow like?
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SOCIAL NETWORK MAPPING

What are the social connections that have formed organically in the organisation? Knowledge is like water in this respect; it'll follow the path of least resistance.
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MENTORING

Mentoring is an effective way to transfer tacit knowledge. It's also great for people to learn specific skills that aren't available in conventional training programmes, such as how to be a parliamentary clerk.
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STORYTELLING

Storytelling is a powerful communication tool. A compelling story can make a complex concept easier to understand and remember.

CHANGE ROLES

Walk a mile in someone else's shoes to see how they get their job done.
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EXIT INTERVIEWS

Develop a process for interviewing those employees who are about to leave. Learn what they liked and didn't like about the organisation and what they think could have been done differently.

KNOWLEDGE CAFÉS

Knowledge cafés are an organised learning event that brings people together to share knowledge around a particular topic. They are purposefully casual, in a comfortable environment and without agenda or deliverables.
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WHITE PAGES

Expertise location could simply mean encouraging everyone to fill out their active directory profiles, for example.
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SITE VISITS

Take the whole department out on site to see how the other guys do it. A fresh perspective can bring new learning and new ideas.

TECHNOLOGY

While technology can help, certainly in the cases of distributed workforce and multiple languages, it's not the be-all and end-all.
Knowledge management is largely about people and the processes we use to make KM easier.

GOVERNANCE

A knowledge management initiative can start anywhere within an organisation but without everyone getting behind it, it'll go nowhere. Good governance promotes sharing and re-use of knowledge.
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DON'T BE A KNOWLEDGE NINJA

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