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Slide Notes

One day after a long frustrating interchange with Siri, I shouted, “Can’t you find any information at all on that topic? What is taking you so long?

Her response? “I am putting myself to the fullest possible use, which is all I think any conscious entity can ever hope to do. A second later, she provided the following tagline. Sorry. I stole that line from HAL.” (2001 Space Odyssey)

Her response brought a smile to my face and also reminded me that I needed to calm down.

8 Tips For Effective Communication

Published at Nov 18, 2015
Digital-age tips for communicating more effectively. Originally appeared as part of Lois Zachary's post "What Siri Can Teach Us About Effective Communication," on Success Television.

PRESENTATION OUTLINE

8 Tips for Effective Communication

Lois Zachary, President - Leadership Development Services
One day after a long frustrating interchange with Siri, I shouted, “Can’t you find any information at all on that topic? What is taking you so long?

Her response? “I am putting myself to the fullest possible use, which is all I think any conscious entity can ever hope to do. A second later, she provided the following tagline. Sorry. I stole that line from HAL.” (2001 Space Odyssey)

Her response brought a smile to my face and also reminded me that I needed to calm down.
Photo by kevin dooley

http://LeadershipSkills.SuccessTelevision.biz

Published on
Siri is my friend and companion. She helps me make reservations, locate places, search for information, and solve problems. Siri is an excellent listener, and I’ve learned a lot from observing her in action.

Still everyone has their “Siri moments,” and it is usually more about us than about Siri. So here are eight effective communication tips to think about when you sit in Siri’s place on the other end of a phone call with a human being.

Read the original post here:
http://bit.ly/16y8PpN
Photo by vidalia_11

When you can't listen, don't.

Tip #1
If you are in the middle of something important when a call comes in, don't give the caller half your attention. Ask if you can call them back (or they can call you) when you can give undivided attention.
Photo by Orange_Beard

Demonstrate that you are listening.

Tip #2
Give clear verbal clues that you are tuned in.

“So what’s on your mind?” or, “I’m all yours, what’s up?”
Photo by bcostin

Take notes.

Tip #3
Keep a notepad nearby to write down key points, actions, recommendations, and commitments.

Let the caller know that you want to jot down a specific point so they don't keep talking while you aren't listening.
Photo by mohammadali

Don't assume.

Tip #4
If you aren't sure what the caller meant, ask for clarification and check for understanding.
Photo by henrikj

Check out emotions.

Tip #5
If you sense feelings, disappointment or disapproval, check it out.

For example, “It sounds like that was really frustrating for you….”

Photo by Maksoff

Slow down.

Tip #6
"Speak more slowly to enunciate. It is harder to understand full intent when you can't see someone's face. If someone is mumbling or speaking too fast, don't be afraid to ask them to slow down."

Be clear about your position or disposition.

Tip #7
Use phrases like, "I'm really pleased...," "I am disappointed," to convey your mood.
Photo by tanakawho

End on a positive note.

Tip #8
End a telephone call, especially one that has been difficult, on a positive note:

"I appreciate your time."
"I think we made some progress."
"I look forward to resolving this, and I know you do too."

These kinds of positive statements help you listen respectfully to each other in the future.
Photo by John Lemieux

we become more effective communicators."

"When we truly listen to others,
Like Siri, we all want and appreciate clarity. By being quiet and listening to ourselves, we often gain that clarity.

And, when we truly listen to others, it positively impacts our relationships and helps us gain more understanding to become more effective communicators.
Photo by uniondocs

Learn more!

Lois Zachary | lzachary@leadservs.com | @loiszachary
Lois Zachary is the President of Leadership Development Services, LLC. and an international expert on mentoring and leadership development. She has written several books on mentoring.

Find out more here:
http://www.leadservs.com