Sarah Maitland

Sarah Maitland is Senior Lecturer in Translation at Goldsmiths, University of London, where she leads the MA in Translation. She is author of various articles on cultural translation, translation philosophy and hermeneutics. Her current research focuses on the politics of recognition and its bearing on questions of ethics and justice in multicultural society. Her forthcoming book – entitled What is Cultural Translation? – examines these and other areas and will be published by Bloomsbury Academic. She leads project TransCast: Making Translating and Interpreting Research Public, which hosts free podcasts of cutting-edge translation research for students, scholars and practitioners of translation worldwide. She is also a professional theatre translator and has written for the Theatre Royal Bath, the Unicorn and New Diorama theatres in London and the Rose Bruford College of Theatre and Performance.

12 Haiku Decks

Performing Opposition: Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda and the Translator's GPS

Performing Opposition: Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda and the Translator's GPS

22 Slides15 Views

Education

Presentation at Cardiff University on 11 April 2017.

Sarah Maitland is Senior Lecturer in Translation Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London, where she convenes the MA and PhD programmes in Translation.

For more information, email: s.maitland@gold.ac.uk

Performing Opposition: Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda and the Translator's GPS

Reflecting on a text’s autonomy with respect to its author’s intentions and original reception, Paul Ricoeur, in from Text to Action (2008) observed that the task of interpretation “is to reconstruct the internal dynamic of the text, and to restore to the work its ability to project itself outside itself in the representation of a world that I could inhabit” (18). The meaning of the author and the meaning of the text no longer coincide; the reader must make present what is absent, perceiving a world “in which I could project my ownmost possiibilities” (34).

Focusing on the translation of the dramatic works of Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda for performance in English, a project which has as its stated aim to build an audience and enhance female representation on stage, in translation and in scholarship, I offer a metareflection on what it means for the academic translator to take an oppositional stance against a given status quo, to advocate for an alternative reality and to locate it within the text-for-translation. By conceptualizing this as an act of ‘inhabitation’ - constructing, rather than ‘retrieving’, meaning - I argue that the interpretive task of translation geo-locates the translator within the time and space of reading, a position from which all acts of advocacy are seen to create their own object.

Translation and the Trials of Advocacy

Translation is built on the impetus of an initial act of hermeneutic trust: that what we aim to translate will find a new home, a new set of interlocutors, a new audience. Inevitably, the subjectivity of the translator comes into play, but this subjectivity is not singular. It is located in a community, in a set of assumptions, beliefs, a view of the status quo, a deliberate construction of the landscape into which the newly translated piece will be received. In this sense, translators are advocates, and this is a tense and complicated role. It is, incidentally, a role that academic translators are seen to get wrong in the choices we make, in our reading of audiences, our demands for translation. The translator, in many ways, makes informed guesses that they have to stand up and defend as they try to guide the new work into its possible new home.

This panel seeks to explore the questions of advocacy inherent in the act of translation. How does the translator move in what is a dialectic of time and space? That is, the translator, as agent for the text, is located in a space in which they are both reader and audience, imputing potential reactions to or roles for the translated text in the receiving culture. Yet, receiving cultures might resist or reject the translated text as it moves through the many actors and agents that will decide, from their own subjectivities, whether the text is worth reproducing. It is the tensions at the heart of this dialectic that we want to question. Why advocate for specific texts? Where does advocacy happen? How does the translator start to gauge the potential for an audience? Is there such a thing as the autonomy of the text? How do we negotiate the different forms of resistance of the receiving culture, or completing advocacies, for example, economic, material, ideological? In whom are we investing belief as translators?

The idea for this panel comes from the work of Out of the Wings, where advocacy for Spanish and Latin American theatre has formed the basis of practical, theoretical and methodological work we have developed. It also relates to the core ideas of the new AHRC-funded project ‘Language Acts and Worldmaking’, which has at its heart the study of the material and historical force of language. We are looking for papers that study contemporary and historical forms of advocacy in translating and hope to be able to cover different literary forms, including the dramatic text, poetry and prose.

Applying for work as a translator - How to make cover letters work for you

Applying for work as a translator - How to make cover letters work for you

20 Slides29 Views

Education

Presentation at Goldsmiths, University of London on 22 November 2016.

Sarah Maitland is Senior Lecturer in Translation Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London, where she convenes the MA and PhD programmes in Translation.

For more information, email: s.maitland@gold.ac.uk

Translation and social media: what do memes teach us about translation and social activism?

Translation and social media: what do memes teach us about translation and social activism?

55 Slides70 Views

Education

Presentation at Universidad Pontificia Comillas on 2 November 2016.

Sarah Maitland is Senior Lecturer in Translation Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London, where she convenes the MA and PhD programmes in Translation.

For more information, email: s.maitland@gold.ac.uk