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Creating a coaching webinar with Haiku Deck

In the last post, we explored how webinars can be the key to expanding your coaching practice online. Haiku Deck makes it easy to turn an idea, product or previously conducted talk into a webinar. It can seem like a large endeavor, but preparing a webinar is almost identical to preparing almost any other type of presentation. In some cases, it can even be easier! Let’s take a look at how to turn an idea, service or previous talk into a new deck and how to share it!

Idea:

  1. Draft out how you would explain the idea to a client in person.
  2. Think about how you would pitch the new process or strategy to them and try to anticipate some of their questions.
  3. Break down the idea into a few key points and answers to questions.
  4. Put one point in each slide and find evocative imagery for the backgrounds using our image search tool. You should back up each point with a  supporting detail or two.
  5. Once you have this body of you presentation done, add a few slides of introduction to who you are and what you are going to talk about.  
  6. Finally, sign off with a thank you, some contact info, and, if you want, a question/answer section.

Check out our webinar template for more advice on structure and formatting . Copy it into your account and use it to contrust your first webinar!


Webinar Template – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

Service/Class:

Pitching a service or class on the web is very similar to pitching it in person or pitching an idea to a client. Start with your focus, breaking down the product or class into key points. This is the main body of your webinar. Just as for an idea webinar, build out short introduction and closing sections. However, for a successful sales webinar, find a small lesson or valuable part of the product and give it away for free. Whether that’s a slide where you talk about a specific lesson they will learn in your class, or a free download of a planning worksheet or short e-book, giving your audience a sample will draw them in much faster.

Check out this template deck by Lauren Edwards to learn a bit more about creating a sales webinar.


21 point outline – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

Previously Conducted Talk:

If you already have a deck set up from a previous talk, you can just use that! A webinar is really just a seminar on the web, there isn’t that much you should do differently. If you have a PowerPoint, you can plug it into Zuru which will help you quickly transform it into a polished, professional presentation. You can also use any previously created Haiku Deck and just follow the recording/sharing instructions down below.

Using the Webinar

Once you have a deck set up, it is time to record your voiceover. Using the audio recording tool (microphone icon in the left sidebar), record the voiceover for each slide. This audio will be linked to your slides so that no matter how you share, your clients will have access to what you are saying.

Finally, export or share the deck. If you want to lead the webinar with a webinar software that allows for live Q/A and paid sign in, export your deck to your computer and upload it to the software of your choice. You can also easily export your presentation as a video with your audio narration and slides for sharing on YouTube or your personal site, or you can share the deck on Haiku Deck. Sharing on Haiku Deck lets your presentation be interactive—clients can click between slides and your audio narration will follow them in whatever order they choose.

 

 

No matter what process you use to create your webinar, or how you choose to share it, we hope that Haiku Deck makes it straightforward and simple. If you have any questions about webinars with Haiku Deck or any pointers of your own, please don’t hesitate to drop me a message at team@haikudeck.com. To get more info on Haiku Deck and coaching, check out haikudeck.com/coaches.

How To Give a Killer Presentation

Haiku Deck Rock Star Series: Presenting Like a Pro

Is one of your new year’s resolutions to up your presentation game?

Between the “fresh start” feeling and the celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr. — undoubtedly one of the most enthralling public speakers of all time — there’s no better time of year to tackle this elusive goal head-on.

Is there a perfect way to give a killer presentation? Well, not exactly. You’ll have to find your way.

You can take inspiration from these five outstanding live presentations, or get a few ideas for structure and flow from this new killer speech template.


Killer Speech Template – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

Rock Star Tips for Killer Presentations

The MOST IMPORTANT THING I would emphasize to you, as you contemplate how to give a killer presentation, is that one slide does not fit all — if you’re presenting live, you need to have far, far less text than if you’re creating a piece of standalone content to be read (more on this topic in How To Build Thought Leadership).

If you’re presenting live, you need to have far, far less text than if you’re creating a piece of standalone content to be read.

If you’d like to share your slides after your in-the-room talk (which I strongly encourage you to do — presentations are killer pieces of personal intellectual property), I suggest using Notes to add detail and context or to create handouts, or copying your slides and fleshing your ideas out a bit more so they stand alone.

A few other rock star tips:

  • Make your presentation feel cohesive, thematically and visually, by identifying a central theme to inspire your words and images. See, for example, this presentation I gave at AMA Houston, where I used origami images throughout to evoke the Haiku Deck logo. (Notice also how I included most of what I said in the room in the Notes, to make the meaning more clear without cluttering up my slides.)
How to Give a Killer Presentation: Using unifying thematic imagery

An example of unifying thematic imagery

  • Mix up your slide types so they don’t get repetitive. Try to work in a few paragraph slides, a list or two, some charts, and some high-impact headline slides.
  • Be sure to keep your slide text minimal so you will never, ever be tempted to read it out loud to your audience, which research shows is by far the most annoying thing you can do as a presenter. Find out the other annoying things to avoid here.
  • Even if you have a “set” presentation that you give frequently, take the time to customize your message to the audience and the location. This could be through the opening and closing stories you tell, the examples you highlight, or the images you choose.

Your Turn

We’d love to see your killer Haiku Deck presentation! Please share links in the comments, or tweet them with the hashtag #hdgallery.

More in the Rock Star Series

How To Build Thought Leadership

How To Make Your Company Values Visible

How To Promote Your Business or Service

How To Make Your Company Values Visible

Haiku Deck Rock Star Series: Showcasing Company Values and Culture

There’s nothing quite like the last few work days of the year — they’re a bit quieter yet also more festive, with heightened camaraderie and (if your office is anything like ours) heightened quantities of hot chocolate and peppermint bark. Creative fuel, we call it…

In my book, it’s an ideal time for reflecting on the year’s accomplishments and tackling important, yet often-delayed, projects like capturing company values and guiding principles. Here’s one I put together in well under an hour.


Haiku Deck Culture and Core Values – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

Here’s another nice example from Neal Kearney Realty:


Kearney Realty Co. – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

Making values visible — and visual — helps make them real, and also sets the tone beautifully for next year’s plans and goals.

After all, if your company values and mission/vision statements truly matter, they deserve to be showcased in a beautiful, inspiring format, not pinned forlornly to the wall above the copy machine or buried in an Intranet folder.

Making values visible — and visual — helps make them real, and also sets the tone beautifully for next year’s plans and goals.

To help you get to that satisfying “done” even faster, here’s a template you can use to showcase your company values in a beautiful, visual Haiku Deck.


Culture and Core Values Haiku Deck Presentation Template – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

Rock Star Tips for Making Company Values Visible

  • This is a great place to make use of the new logo slide type — try using it for the first and last slides of your Haiku Deck.
  • The paragraph slide type gives you a bit more text to work with for capturing a concise founding story, an inspiring quote from your founder, or a well-crafted mission statement. If you need more space, you can always add detail in the Notes field.
Rock Star Series: Making Company Values Visible with Haiku Deck

Sample paragraph slide

Your Turn

We’d love to see your company values in Haiku Deck form! Please share links in the comments, or tweet them with the hashtag #hdgallery.

More in the Rock Star Series

How To Build Thought Leadership

How To Give a Killer Presentation

How To Promote Your Business or Service

How to Build Thought Leadership

Haiku Deck Rock Star Series: Building Thought Leadership

We believe everybody has ideas and stories that are worth sharing — yes, you!

It might be social media tips, a unique approach to landing real estate listings, or thoughts about the future of education or ecommerce, but your unique expertise and insights can help others interested in your topic, and they can help you extend your personal brand as well through thought leadership.

At work we think and talk a lot about presentation technology and trends (naturally), but I don’t always take the time to zoom out and capture these thoughts.

When I noticed that one of the month’s showcase themes on SlideShare was “Future Of…,” it was pretty easy to put this together.


The Future of Presentations: Top Trends for Communicators – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

I uploaded my Haiku Deck to SlideShare (where it reached more than 10,000 people in a single weekend), shared it on all of my social networks, and added a link to my email signature. Sometimes I’m wowed by how quickly content like this can spread when you just put your ideas out there.

Sometimes I’m wowed by how quickly content like this can spread when you just put your ideas out there.

What kind of thought leadership content could you create? What have you learned or observed this year, or what trends do you see for next year? I’d love to see your thought leadership Haiku Decks out there, spreading ideas and inspiration.

What have you learned or observed this year, or what trends do you see for next year?

To make it easy, here’s an idea sharing template you can use as a visual model, plus my favorite “rock star” tips:


Idea Sharing Presentation Template – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

Rock Star Tips for Creating Thought Leadership Content

  • This is an ideal place to try out the new logo slide type — you can add your company logo or even a picture of yourself to connect your ideas to your identity.
  • For this kind of highly shareable content, you want to make sure your message is self-contained within your slides. It’s a perfect place to use the paragraph slide type to be sure each idea is expressed clearly and fully. (Remember that more and more presentation content is viewed on mobile devices, where Notes may not be visible.)
Building thought leadership: Sample paragraph slide type

Sample paragraph slide 

  • This doesn’t mean you should cram your slides full of text, however — you want to keep your ideas crisp, clear, and easy to scan.
  • You can set your deck privacy to “private” or “restricted” while you’re working on it, but don’t forget to change it to “public” to get your ideas out there!

Rock Star Tips for Promoting Your Thought Leadership Content

Building thought leadership: Optimizing your decks for Twitter

Tweets with images win!

 Your Turn

We’d love to see your thought leadership Haiku Decks! Please share links in the comments, or tweet them with the hashtag #hdgallery.

More in the Rock Star Series

How To Make Company Values Visible

How To Give a Killer Presentation

How To Promote Your Business or Service

The New Corporate Template

Corporate Templates: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

To me, a corporate template is kind of like a pinstripe suit — professional and conservative, but (usually) not particularly exciting.

Most corporate templates are like a pinstripe suit: professional, but not exciting

Templates are like pinstripes: professional, but not particularly exciting

And let’s face it — the corporate template is as pervasive as bad PowerPoint in today’s business culture.

Nearly every company and brand has one, and in my role as Haiku Deck’s Chief Inspiration Officer, I’ve seen plenty of them — beautiful, bland, and downright hideous.

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This would fall into the latter category….

Now as a bona fide brand geek, I appreciate that there are plenty of great intentions behind most corporate templates — they keep brand expression consistent, they give presentations a cohesive, polished look, and (in most cases) they give presentation creators a leg up in terms of design, structure, and layout.

But I believe corporate templates also have a few drawbacks that are worth noting:

1. They take valuable space (and attention) away from the content being presented.

2. In the rush of presentation prep, slides from different templates are often combined into a single presentation, resulting in a mishmash instead of a polished whole.

3. Just like a presentation using endless header-and-bullet slides, corporate templates can set a tone of uniformity and, well, corporateness that subtly signals “This is going to be boring.” Especially in longer presentations, it gets monotonous.

Zooming out a bit, corporate templates do not exactly encourage creativity or inspiration on the part of the presenter, and I can’t help but feel that at some level they disrespect the intelligence of the audience. Putting a logo or a company name on every single slide seems to suggest that the audience is going to forget where they are, or who they’re talking to. It’s just overkill.

Putting a logo on every single slide seems to suggest that the audience is going to forget who they’re talking to.

Bottom line: It’s really only your company who cares about your company template.

A New Take on the Template

I love working with companies, large and small, to help them create beautifully branded Haiku Decks that loosen the tie, so to speak, on the typically stuffy corporate template.

Here’s one we created for our friends at OfficeNinjas:


The OfficeNinjas Story – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

Here’s another example of a Haiku Deck that’s branded with a lighter touch:


Ideas that Stick – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

7 Strategies for a More Creative Corporate Template

You might not be able to abandon your corporate template wholesale, but perhaps you can experiment a bit. Here are my top tips to help you try out this new approach.

1. Try putting your logo on the first and last slides, not on every slide. (Tip: The new Haiku Deck logo layout is ideal for this.)


Haiku Deck: Startup Story – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires
The new Haiku Deck logo slide layout makes this a snap[/caption]

2. Include boilerplate or legalese on one slide, not every slide.

3. Include your hashtag or Twitter handle at the beginning of your presentation (or sprinkle throughout), not on every slide.


Visual Storytelling with Haiku Deck – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires
Include your hashtag at the beginning of your presentation, not on every slide[/caption]

4. Include your contact info at the end of your presentation, not (you guessed it) on every slide.

New corporate template: Sample contact info slide

Sample contact info slide to close a presentation

5. Instead of repeating slide headings, try using solid-color, standalone slides to introduce new topics or sections. (Tip: In Haiku Deck, you can now create solid-color backgrounds to match your brand colors using the new color picker.)

New corporate template: Sample section break slide

Try a solid-color section break slide instead of repeating slide headers

6. Use creative imagery to evoke or illustrate your brand — you don’t have to resort to logos alone. You can include images of actual products, people, places, or symbolic objects that relate to your brand or company.

For example, when I give talks about Haiku Deck, I prefer to represent our brand with beautiful images of colorful origami instead of showing our logo over and over again.


10 Tips to Transform Your Presentations – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires
Try using evocative imagery to express your brand in place of logos[/caption]

7. Experiment with choosing photographs and colorful backgrounds that showcase your brand colors in a more stimulating way.  If your company colors are, say, blue and green, try doing an image search for “blue green,” “blue green abstract,” or “blue green pattern.” (Tip: You can now match your brand’s colors exactly using custom color slide backgrounds.)

New Corporate Template: Using abstract colors

Try using abstract patterns in your brand colors for a creative twist

New corporate template: Using abstract patterns in brand colors

Your Turn

What ideas do you have for loosening the tie on the corporate template? We’d love to hear your thoughts and see your examples — feel free to share your creations at gallery@haikudeck.com.

More Helpful Resources

If you found this article helpful, you might enjoy these as well:

Rethinking the Case Study Format

Irene Yam had an “aha” moment recently — case studies are the most important B2B marketing tool, yet in their traditional text-heavy format, it’s challenging to get them approved (let alone read). Why not make them visual?

The Visual Case Study Approach

Irene has been using Haiku Deck to transform the typical case study format, making her project write-ups more visual, more engaging, and ultimately more effective (examples below).

“Haiku Deck has really changed the way I think about engaging customers for case studies. Traditional case studies don’t really get read. Case studies are more like “proof” to show to potential customers.”

She has distilled her best tips into this awesome visual case study template — click to view Irene’s template with her step-by-step suggestions.

Template for a Visual Case Study Format
Irene’s Template for a Visual Case Study Format

Visual Case Study Examples

Why do visual case studies work? In Irene’s words,

“Today, most people lack the time or willingness to read case studies or white papers. Many readers prefer to click and snack on catchy titles, bullet points and summaries — the sticky stuff.”

Another benefit is a streamlined approval process — she has found that with the visual case study format, the turnaround time for getting her case studies approved dropped from two months or more to under a week.

Here are a couple of Irene’s case studies in Haiku Deck format.

Visual Case Study Format Example: Southern Farm Bureau Casualty Insurance Company

SFBCIC Visual Case Study Example

Visual Case Study Format Example: City of Milpitas, California

City of Milpitas Visual Case Study Example

Irene has gotten positive feedback from her sales team as well because the new format makes the case studies easier to share.

Be sure to read her full write-up on LinkedIn, where she details strategies for structuring case studies and getting them turned around quickly.

The Case for Visual Case Studies

Visual case studies are an all-around win:

  • Faster approval time
  • More likely to be read and understood
  • Easier to share
  • Flexible, valuable brand asset
  • Make your work stand out

Share Your Story

Have a killer Haiku Deck visual case study? You can easily embed it in your LinkedIn profile to demonstrate your work in a standout way — and be sure to share it with us, too, at gallery@haikudeck.com.

 

 

 

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